Pages Navigation Menu
Categories Navigation Menu

French Cuisines

Q & A with French Louie’s Executive Chef Ryan Angulo

Neighborhood: | Featured in Chef Q&A

Chef Ryan Angulo and owner Doug Crowell already happened upon a winning formula with their popular Brooklyn bistro, Buttermilk Channel. While essentially a New American restaurant, there’s still a good deal of French influence and execution involved. That’s why they elected to flip the script only slightly with their long anticipated (five years!) follow up project, French Louie, with a boîte that’s yes, largely French, but with a smidge of American flavor and flair…

Read More

Q & A with Rotisserie Georgette’s Georgette Farkas

Neighborhood: | Featured in Chef Q&A, Restaurant

Rotisserie Georgette’s owner, Georgette Farkas, is very well known in the restaurant industry — but not for, well, running restaurants. That’s because the New York native has spent the last 20 years as Director of Marketing for Daniel Boulud, helping launch his seminal flagship, Daniel, in 1993. So how did such a media powerhouse end up opening a high-end, rotisserie spot?

Read More

Daniel

Neighborhood: | Featured in RG's Favorites

Some restaurants never get old. They just get better.  Daniel is proof of that.  After 20 years, you’d think Daniel Boulud’s...

Read More

Rotisserie Georgette – Reviewed

Neighborhood: | Featured in Hottest Newcomers, Reviews

God knows New York could always use a few more great restaurants north of 57th Street on the east side. I know, I know; solid progress has been made over the years (The Mark, Salumeria Rosi, & The East Pole), but nonetheless there remains a culinary no man’s land between uptown and midtown. Aside from Fred’s at Barney’s, Rouge Tomate and the famously overpriced Nello, there ain’t a lot of choices. But things have been looking up since Rotisserie Georgette flung open its doors on 60th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues. Who would have thought you could get a killer Roast Chicken in these parts? Or better yet, a Roast Chicken for Two…

Read More

Restaurant Letdowns: Pagani & Villard

Neighborhood: , | Featured in Reviews

If you’re a foodie, there’s nothing more exciting than discovering a great, new restaurant. And there’s nothing worse than wasting an evening at a mediocre or awful, new eatery, especially if you’ve dragged a group of friends along with you. Something about it being “new” makes it all the more depressing when hopes of a potentially fantastic find are dashed and calories wasted. But the truth is it happens all the time…

Read More

Dish Spotting: The French Onion Soup Burger at Little Prince

Neighborhood: | Featured in Dish Spotting

Chef at the family-owned Le Rivage, which has wooed Hells Kitchen with garlicky Escargots and buttery Sole Meuniere since 1982, Paul Denamiel is essentially French food royalty. So it only made sense that the scion should open his own charming bistro called Little Prince… even if it’s just named after the SoHo street, and not actually a tongue-in-cheek reference to his culinary lineage.

Read More

Le Philosophe

Neighborhood: | Featured in Hottest Newcomers

Le Philosophe doesn’t look like the new “It” restaurant, but it’s as nearly impossible to get a reservation right now. So what’s all the fuss about? It could be their wondrously plump Bouchot Mussels, basking in an addictive broth that’s flavored with aleppo peppers, leeks, potatoes, creme fraiche and god knows what else, but it’s excellent. (And there’s plenty of bread to soak up any leftover broth with!) It’s a dish rivaled only by the Cured Foie Gras Terrine, sided by Quince Jam and thick, Toasted Brioche to smear the wonderfully unctuous, salt-cured paté on. You could easily make a meal of these two dishes alone, but pace yourself there’s more to come.

Read More

Le Philosophe – Reviewed

Neighborhood: | Featured in First Bite, Restaurant, Reviews

Le Philosophe doesn’t look much like a French bistro. Aside from the French food lingo printed on the walls, like “Plat Du Jour” and “Bouillabaisse,” there’s nothing particularly French about this spot, located on a chic stretch of Bond Street in NoHo. Instead of tin ceilings, tiles and red banquettes, there’s black ceilings, a sea of twinkling little votives to light up the dimly lit space, and an open kitchen with a teeny bar in the rear. (It ain’t no Balthazar.) The crowd is interesting and eclectic.

Read More

French Culinary Institute

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

You do know you don’t have to go to a restaurant on Valentine’s Day, right?  You could take a cooking class together.  ...

Read More

Pates et Traditions’ Buckwheat Crepes

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of, Winter Eats

This charming Williamsburg creperie has over 24 savory crepe options, but what sets them apart from traditional, white-flour crepes is...

Read More

La Bonne Soupe’s French Onion Soup

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

“La Bonne Soupe” means the good life, with wishes for wealth, health, and happiness. While the good people over at La Bonne Soupe might not be able to deliver on all of that at this little French bistro, their French Onion Soup comes close.

Read More

Q & A with La Villette’s Chef Christophe Bonnegrace

Neighborhood: | Featured in Chef Q&A

At age 14, Provence-born chef Christophe Bonnegrace was convinced his cooking career was over before it had started.  His first job, as an...

Read More

Bar Boulud

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of, Holiday Eats

The great thing about living in America is eating just about anything is patriotic, including French food.  That’s right.   I said...

Read More

Jean Georges

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

Jean Georges Vongerichten’s eatery is one of the world’s best restaurants, offering unexpected combinations that dazzle critics and gastronomes from near and far. His Foie Gras Brûlée is no exception to the standard.

Read More

Le Comptoir

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

Le Comptoir’s brunchy riff on Crème Brulée, the French Toast Brulée comes in an oblong soufflé dish and looks like a mass of bread and sugar at first (which, by the way, is perfectly acceptable on its own).

Read More

Balthazar

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

Balthazar is one of New York’s great French restaurants. People come here for the scene and to eat classic French dishes, like Steak Au Poivre, French Onion Soup, and Apple Tarte Tatin. So where else would you go for a classic French-style Steak Tartare than to Keith McNally’s Paris bistro-inspired masterpiece?

Read More

Rouge et Blanc

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

If you haven’t been to Rouge et Blanc, the Ceviche is a perfect excuse… to start anyway. But there’s a lot to adore about this French-Vietnamese sleeper in Soho. The small plates menu make it ideal for a date or a light dinner where you can share and sample the scope of the menu, which includes Vietnamese Sausage and Hanoi Chicken.

Read More

New York's Best Brasseries & Bistros

Neighborhood: | Featured in Best Of

It used to be that you had to travel to Paris for good brasserie or bistro cooking.  But nowadays, the lines between the bistro and...

Read More

Minetta Tavern

Neighborhood: | Featured in Reviews

Cuisine: French bistro Occasion: See-and-be-seen dinner, date, group ­dinner Don’t Miss: Lobster salad, roasted chicken, ­Minetta...

Read More

Le Cirque

Neighborhood: , | Featured in Reviews

In the lounge, it’s Le Cirque in blue jeans. 151 E. 58th St. (between Lexington and Third Aves) (212) 644-0202 Dinner, Mon.-Sat.,...

Read More
12